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in the united states, i have to be honest with you. i love the united states, i admire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested here. >> yes, the united states is the leader of the world. it's going to be the leader of the world for many years to come. forget china's going to come out you're down. >> rose: that means? >> when you have a country has $14 trillion of cumulative debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competing, that's not good. >> rose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeable fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic vices that hit you badly and it was contagious, things are not we were there but you can get out of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bin talal for the hour next. ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. he's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him as one of the world's 25 most wealthiest people. "time" magazine
at a still unfolding economic disaster. the united states goes after al qaeda in yemen. we will talk about it on our roundtable tonight. and who says the news business is dead? in taiwan, they're drawing new viewers by animating it all. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the world, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. welcome to "worldfocus." i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the global economy and news of the key economic barometer, unemployment. in this country, the government said today it held steady at 10% last month as moyers cut 85,000 jobs which was more than expected. the news was disappointing in europe. in the 16 countries that used the euro as their currency, the jobless wrought was also 10%. in this case, for the month of november, up from 9.9% in octob
of the united states military is we grow and develop people. i mean i've had dozens of these interviews with people, okay, you're getting a few job. this is turning over a new leaf. this is a time to go get it. we've seen people turn their lives around. this is one of the great things about our institution. so clearly these are issues that the policymakers have to come to grips with. our task was put the spotlight on policies, weaknesses, gaps, that's what we have tried to do. i do believe there may be places where barriers should be retained in some way. >> and maybe for some. >> for some purpose. >> maybe promotions or -- >> exactly. >> whether it's a security issue. >> exactly. but what i'm suggesting is that people who are responsible for these policy decisions know what the vital dots look like. they know where they come from. as i -- the report said and in my earlier testimony, the time has passed for us to be having the turf wars on who owns the information. >> i couldn't agree with you more. this is a major challenge for all of us in the senate and house and committee and being
with you. i love thenited states, i mire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested he. >> yes,the united states is t leader of the world. it's going to be t leader of the world formany years to come. forget china's going to come out you'reown. >> rose: thameans? >> when you have a coury has $14 trillion of cumulive debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competin that's not good. >> rose: debt or d.p.? >> yes. and wn youave a buet deaf sit of a trillion dolrs going for the foreseeable fuer, it's unacceptable. when you he economic vices that hit youadly and it was contagious, things a not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him the arabian warren buett. his fi has major stakes in banks, hotel and mea coanies. his largest vestment is i
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
concern for the united states. and then it seems to falter for a number of reasons. it appears that progress is made but then when it goes back to iran, the deal that was worked out falls apart. was this planned on the part of the iranian government? or was this truly just some sort of miscommunication by those who were in geneva and said, yes, we can do this, and it gets back to tehran, it doesn't work. >> yeah, i don't think i would bury that proposal. it's still ongoing. the suggestion -- >> you think this is still open? >> still open. initially, iran actually accepted the u.n./u.s. proposal, which was enrichment would be taking place in russia, in france. then they backed away from that. but -- >> just to remind people, this is so that the nuclear material, in theory, would not be then able to be used in some sort of weapon. >> right. it would be enriched abroad and then given to iran in limited amounts for medical purposes. and iran originally accepted that. then when it went to tehran, there was obviously, behind closed doors, division. they rejected that. >> are we suppo
and the united states. in fact, many of the country's use proportional representation, public financing of campaigns. >> we might back up and explain proportional representation. it is not well understood in america at all. >> it is not. the quickest explanation is it produces multi-party democracy. >> some time to many parties like in italy -- not in ireland, that is proportional, but it actually has three. >> you can fine-tune your democracy by setting what you call a victory threshold. how many parties. in the unites the states with a system that is democrat or republican in many districts and most districts are so non- competitive we can tell you who will wind. >> in short hand, first past the post. >> winner-take-all. >> it has worked very well in the uk. periodically the labour party says it will go to proportional representation and then they realized they may lose some of the viability and backs off it. there are a lot of use of europe and america that it is old, that it is bureaucratic beyond belief, that it is overtaxed, that people don't work hard enough, that it is not compe
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
at those the washington post. calling for allowing haitians in the united states who are here illegally to find work. "the new york times" echoing "the washington post." the first phone call comes from chris on independent mine in ohio. good morning. caller: the morning. everybody keeps getting -- host: go ahead, we can hear you. caller: pat robertson was right. it did -- they did sell their souls to the devil. not that we should not help -- we should help. they went with the french -- now they're asking americans to save us. host: what part of history are you saying? caller: pat roberts and back -- said back in 1761, i think, that they chose to sell their souls to the devils -- the french, communist, but they are begging us to help. we cannot even support ourselves. we are getting ripped off by our own government. how can we support them, too? i don't understand -- we are starving to death and, yes, i understand it was a natural disaster but it was not our fault and that understand we should help, there is no problem with that, but why is it we are starving to death, too. host: what ab
into the airport as well. >> there was the indication last night from the haitian ambassador to the united states that communication was very, very difficult with the haitian government. explain some of the challenges that poses to the obama administration, to all these agencies that want to get involved when it's very difficult it trying to find out exactly who you can talk to in haiti. >> well, the problem is you can bring supplies in but how do you distribute them? that allows you to coordinate first to find out where the needs are and, second, to have a system in place so you can get the food, the water, the medicine to where it needs to be. and that means getting communications equipment into the field, into the hands of people who can connect up with local officials, local public health authorities and local communities to figure out how to get the commodities that are flowing in into the hands of the people who need them. and then what you need to do as well is bring emergency generators in to begin to restore as much of the local certifica service as you can in this very difficult circums
for. the haitian prime minister tells sky news the death toll could top 100,000. the united states and united nations are reluctant to confirm that we're just now getting our first aerial pictures in. the united states has sent choppers now flying over port-au-prince. as you're seeing here, you're looking at some of the damage. again, we're told port-au-prince is the main epicenter of the damage where buildings have collapsed. especially dangerous these concrete buildings where the roofs themselves were made out of concrete cinder block. when they fall in they cause devastating injury and damage. in many of the slums, the shelters are mostly lean tos, flimy. jeff rossen monitoring from new york. year getting aerial pictures in, the first we're seeing. let's talk about the estimates. if you have the president predicting 100,000 -- >> one of the senators said 500,000. >> any way to confirm that? >> u.s. officials believe, of course, this is a catastrophe. i don't think there's any question about that. they don't believe the numbers will be that high. what's tough about this situation
to help haiti address its own problems. many haitian americans living in the united states have technical expertise in areas such as agriculture, education, health care and infrastructure and would like to return to haiti to assist their people. my bill creates a mechanism to transfer this knowledge in order to meet the needs and the goals of haiti. beyond that we need to ensure that we find other innovative ways to build human capacity, such through education alex changes, programs like i have proposed and other members, the chirly chisholm act, now more than ever, haiti needs the support of its neighbor to the north. even as we deal with our own problems during these tough economic times, we must not turn a blind eye to the untold human suffering just off our shores. today we express our continued support for haiti, we stand in solidarity with the haitians and the haitian americans who have lost loved ones, with the united states citizens still trapped on the island. we stand in solidarity with the rescue workers who have devoted their time and their treasure to help people they do not
of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes in the statement of jefferson. he referred to the united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind and president in history. he referred to the united states and he was president as an empire of liberty, a different kind of empire is what he saw. indeed, as i said, had great visions for the growth of this united states. i've introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington irving story, rip van winkle, which i think captures some of the extraordinary changes that took place in this. in 1789 and 1815. in fact, from the revolution to the second decade of the 19th century. irving, who was conservative and conservative sensibilities, wrote the short story which i think is his most famous short story, most of you are familiar with it. in the second decade of the 19th century. i think he was trying to expres
, the world was weary of this nation. the united states, for example, didn't recognize haiti for the first 58 years of its existence until 1862, a year after the u.s. civil war began. and that was the official beginning of what continues to this day to be a difficult relationship. in 1915, the u.s. sent in a landing force to occupy the nation and the country was in a state of chaos and some said america simply wanted to protect its investments there. whatever the reasons for coming, the americans stayed for almost 20 years. and it was an often brutal occupation. the americans under franklin eleanor roosevelt withdrew in 1934. haiti remained a troubled and deeply chaotic place. 60 years later, they were back and in 1994 under the clinton administration, the american military went in again. this time they came to restore democracy and two years later haiti saw for the first time in its then almost 200-year history a peaceful transition of power from one democratically elected president to another. but then the earthquake and late wednesday afternoon, of course, america returned again. this time
an attack possibly here in the united states. we will have the breaking details just ahead. >>> hello, everybody, i'm david shuster live in new york. let's get the very latest on the situation on the ground in haiti. nbc's kerry sanders is at the airport in port-au-prince where a massive international relief effort is being staged. and kerry, what are you seeing right now? >> reporter: well, david, this is a makeshift ambulance here. americans are being evacuated out. nancy, who is from dallas, is among those who is evacuating out. first of all, your health, how are you? >> i have a pelvic problem but otherwise doing well. >> reporter: great. where were you when the buildings collapsed when the quake hit? >> we were in an eye clinic. >> reporter: so did anything collapse on you? >> oh, yes, a lot of concrete. a lot of concrete ceiling. >> reporter: how did you get dug out? >> several men finally took about two or three hours. two of our girls were completely covered. my upper body was still out. we have one critical, but she's doing good, getting good care now. >> reporter: nancy, tel
more about europe economic difficulti and what they mean for the united states. for that we're joid by one of our regulars. he is from bloomberg busines being. thank you for cing on the program. howould youompare the state of economi recovery in europe veus the utah? > it is not gat for noun. no oneoute now on eitheruds of the pond are in a position to brag. senioriti it is a common language in europe, even with the euro zone yohave a situation marked by e haves and t haves much, much, much, much, hess. it isar more polarized than would you see in michigan. >> breakt town for us more close. how are theountries in eure that matter the most, germany, france, italy and spain, how are they oing? >> we have seen older urm, as some put it, germany, france, somether maurz inestern europe, hold their own. the economies weren't growi that rap you hly that far to beginwith. with the exception of britain, of course. on the flip de of that you have the jump stts. the resurgerients such as spain and lata that reay felt their ecomic growth. and theyaw this newaradigm thinking and they went o and
the united states to have at least one corridor of substantial length that's served by a japanese or a european-style high-speed railroad? >> i think it's important that first off we wait and see what is applied for. you know, obviously i can't start commenting on what we're going to do until applications come forward and are weighed, you know, graded and then approved but clearly again i think we understand the need to ensure that we have very tangible, very, you know, substantial successes. and, you know, clearly again our vision is to follow the model of what the europeans have advanced. you know, keep in mind, when when the system in spain first opened up, you know, again ms. fleming talked about how essentially they begin with one trunk line, they did. they began with their one trunk line. essentially it was six to eight trains a day run being 125 miles an hour and from that they were so successful that they incrementally made the improvements that got them to roughly 20 trains a day at speeds of 200 miles an hour. so this is going to take a buildout, you know, a buildout muc
about the situation in uganda. will you please talk to us a little bit more about how the united states can protect the rights of lgbt people in those areas where their rights are not respected? >> yes. first, let me say that, over this past year, we have elevated into our human rights dialogue and a public statements a very clear message about protecting the rights of the lgbt community worldwide. we are particularly concerned about some of the specific cases that have come to our attention around the world. there have been no organized efforts to kill and maim gays and lesbians in some countries that we have spoken out about and also conveyed are very strong concerns about to their governments, not that they were governmentally implemented or even that the government was aware of them, but that the government's need to pay much greater attention to the kinds of abuses we have seen in iraq, for example. we're deeply concerned about some of the stories coming out of iran. in large measure and reaction, we think, in response to the elections back in june, there have been abuses committed
and ally to united states and the partnership between our countries is -- a new beginning, based on mutual respect and mutual interest that the president called for in cairo. we will discuss how to deepen and broaden our partnership. among the matters that we consulted on -- the situation in yemen is a top concern. how can we work together and with others to stabilize yemen? assist in securing its borders and providing for its people in combating al qaeda? the instability in yemen is a threat to regional and global stability. and we are working with qatar and others to think of the best way forward to duck -- to try to deal with the security concerns. certainly, we know that this is a difficult set of challenges but they have to be addressed. i also thank the prime minister for their efforts to facilitate an end to the crisis in darfur and to promote security and stability in the broader middle east as well as africa. we both have a shared, mutual interest in moving towards a comprehensive peace between israelis and palestinians. we share the goal of an amendment -- an independent and viab
strikes me so strongly about that, to suggest that the president of the united states would then come out and try to use this in some domestic political sense and was somehow favoring -- i'm not sure of the logic, he favored the 500,000 dead in haiti over the one bomber injured in detroit in some way. i'm not following it. >> it makes no sense. and, you know, aren't we all appalled that our president would mount a rescue effort to try to save thousands, tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of people who are either dying right now or who will die in the next few days if they don't get help? you know, shame on the president for trying to alleviate that suffering and prevent those deaths. it's just a ridiculous thing to say. and i hope even his audience of dittoheads realizes that. >> you are dittoing naked, mad, insanity, and racism. eugene robinson, pulitzer prize-winning columnist of "the washington post," and also of msnbc, always a relief to talk to you under these circumstances. >> it's good to talk to you, except under bad circumstances. >> thank you, sir. that's "countdown.
and attention to the policies of freedom itself not only in the united states but around the world. for the first lecture we asked, is freedom for everyone? the speaker did so eloquently that our subsequent speakers have matched. we have heard from economic freedom, religious freedom, on whether the united nations advances the cause of freedom and the important relationship between security and freedom. advancing freedom is a major goal of the heritage foundation and important work that we do here. in fact tomorrow, we will release in hong kong and washington the 16th edition of the index of economic freedom. you will want to stay tuned because there is a bit of big and i'm afraid bad news in the index score for freedom in the united states. our speaker today is dr. charles krauthammer. on december 25, he described president obama's first year in office the year of living fec tilously. most of us know that he writes a column for the "washington post." less known is that he is a harvard educated medical doctor who was a resident of psychiatry at massachusetts general hospital. in 19
began to invade iraq. remember that? only a month later, the congress of the united states voted to allow president bush to invade and occupy iraq. we now are in a second phase of the gop propaganda blitz, and it is even worse this time. this time the folks in massachusetts are the target. i'm a texan, i'm a democrat from texas, a state where we don't have a single democratic statewide official, which is directly opposite massachusetts. if you vote against the democratic candidate today, you will be joining the republicans in their attempt to bring down this obama administration and possibly even the united states government. host: open but the houston chronicle," home state paper has this front-page story -- "the houston chronicle." host: raleigh, north carolina, jim on the republican line. caller: thank you. i would just have to counter fred's argument and say that perhaps this election is somewhat like the shot heard around the world, the first election where the american populace and the voters are going to stand up and say no to the obama socialism machine. i just watch with
. in germany, is "kussler." it is a german name. in the united states it is "kessler." i am not sure if this is a result of american difficulty with foreign languages, although this country is absolutely crammed with people from every country of the world. or maybe it was just before he appeared here and tell people how to pronounce his name. it is generally "kessler." in europe it is "kussler." >> how many years have you spent with him in your life? >> we are talking 20 years. when i say 20 years, i spent that time teaching, so 20 years of vacations interspersed with sabbaticals. >> teaching where? >> i was teaching at cornell until 1994 and then i moved to columbia to teach nonfiction writing and translation which is my other hat that i wear. >> so, you are meeting with him. >> back in 1972, i founded a magazine called "index on censorship." as its name implies, it was about censorship in the arts and censorship of political books as well. i edited this for eight years until 1980 when i resigned to write my first biography which was of another man. souls and need soolzhynitsen i wa
in yemen is an organization that can reach out and touch the united states. that's a major reason general david petraeus went to yemen over the weekend and met with the president there and took messages and we are told pieces of information, and that's a direct quote from a senior u.s. official. pieces of information to president obama. the bottom line they are talking about targeting al qaeda. general petraeus made rare open remarks about yemen over the weekend. >> it's a country that has a lot of challenges. the reduction in oil production, although gas is going up, thankfully. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development, rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. and so very important, indeed, that yemen has taken the actions that it has, and indeed that not just the united states, but countries in the region, its neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> what comes next, heidi? yemen has taken actions. there will be more sharing of intelligence and more targeting information, and more training and equipping of yemenen security force
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
the united states is with regard to health care costs. you might think we spend a lot because we are rich. that is not the case at all. on the vertical asked -- access, we have how much we spend per person. and then on the vertical ac xes we have a much the country spends -- how rich the country is. the u.s. spends about twice as much per person as other countries do on health care. we are 56% higher than the swiss. why are costs high are here? this is what i will be focusing on. there are economic, political, historical ones. i have come up with a list of four reasons why i think health care costs are higher in the united states than elsewhere. a lack of consolidation of purchasing power, medical technology and specialization, paying for unnecessary care and fee-for-service medicine. i am only going to talk about the first one of these. i will leave the others at the end because john skinner will talk about the other three in his talk. to understand lack of consolidation, take a counter example which would be canada. canada has a single payer system. there is only one buyer of care in ca
as techs and resources stocks weigh. and i'm mike huckman in the united states. the economy likely grew at the fastest pace in four years in the fourth quarter, but experts say don't start celebrating just yet. >> hello and welcome to today's program. i'm once again here at the annual meeting of the world economic forum in davos. maria will be joining us shortly, as well. we have a great guest list for you today. we'll be joined we the chief executive of bank of america, brian moynihan. we'll talk to christine lagarde, the french finance minister. we'll be joined by lord mannedelson, amongst a whole host of other guests. we'll be joined by the ceo of china mobile. but before all of that, there's plenty we need to bring you to. christine, over to you. >> hey, ross, good to see you in davos. let's do a quick view where asian markets are trading today. we have earnings in the u.s. are failing to disappoint. they hit some of the tech sector stocks here in asia. of course, we have those concerns about greece and portugal and that seems to be weighing on sentiment, as well. the hang seng off
space. something that the united states can do here that no one else can do, this is now a naval operation. the united states navy is going to have to project themselves and try to help that way. but it is reminiscent of really depressing and sad pictures, but it's also the human factor. these are really hard operations. there is a reason the military is so large and often inefficient. and anyone with any experience of large organizations, there are sclerotic moments and that leads to people dying. >> there is a story out that president obama may be writing "newsweek's" cover story? >> yes. >> it's been a rough week. we haven't had anybody filing on time. federal office holders apparently have a hard time. the president is writing an essay for "newsweek" about why haiti matters. right now, we're in the middle of a very familiar and good ritual in american life. responding to the vivid, televised images of a terrible tragedy. we are texting money. the outpouring has begun, but what it will be like in ten days, what will it be like in a month? i promise you won't be talking about i
of state hillary clinton meets with the 18th president. she assured that the united states would bring medical supplies and food and continue to help with rescue efforts. this is about 10 minutes. >> the press conference will be very difficult because of the noise of the motors. i think mrs. clinton for her visit, which shows, once again, her interest and support for haiti. since the earthquake, president obama has clearly stated how much help the united states and other countries should give to haiti. the last initiative of putting the two last proceeding presidents together to form a fund is, again, a sign of great support. the u.s. aid is already on the territory. i just visited a victim who has been, since five days, taken care of by the military and american medical support in haiti. mrs. clinton's visit really warms our heart today, but especially to reassure the priorities and needs and the coordination and needs to be done since the earthquake. i will not talk on behalf of mrs. clinton, i will let her express what the american government wants to do towards haiti. >> first, --
of friends, but there would be an african- american running for president of the united states, that there would be a woman running for the presidency, that there would be a jewish museum in new york that had such a place of prominence, and that people of all faiths are coming to in humility and appreciation. for me, the relationship between fayed and social justice -- faith and social justice hinges on imaginationfaonith -- on imagination. faith this may be reality. it is a cheap. with work, with struggle, but it begins with vision. i think this is why it is the first four words of martin luther king's famous speech that resonate mostly with us. i have a dream. it is that ability first to be able to say that the reality that we are living in -- and when we talk about social justice, we're not talking about simple change. it is not a question of changing one relationship or one wall. deeply affecting the social structures, economic structures, all that at all different levels and regulations, municipalities, counties, laws, how many changes had to happen in society 40 years it
. there is a joint effort going on between the united states and the vietnamese government. to date in terms of resources dedicated by the united states on this effort roughly $4 million. just recently announced the contracting of 1.7 million, 1.69 to be more precise for the construction of a secured landfill. now i've been to the facility, and what has been done to date is effectively a containment effort. a way of trying to limit public access to contaminated soil, water, lakes, ponds as well as the creation of a catchment area to catching water that would be contaminated with dioxin so that does not spread further in the ecosystem. but this has now created a new situation which is say having contained the problem they are moving to clean up, and they're at least the last i heard is the question was do you just try to clean it up right away or basically move the contaminated soil out of the area and find a way of cleaning it up later. appears to have chosen to do the latter. that is to say move it to an area in a secure landfill and then find a way of trying to remove the dioxin from the e
to share this information with you, our viewers here in the united states and around the world. >>> she was buried alive when the world came tumbling down around her in haiti on tuesday. today a woman in port-au-prince was rescued with barely a scratch on her and with a horrific story to tell. gary tim man was there when she was pulled to safety. how do you feel right now? how are you doing? >> i'm okay. >> reporter: everyone was worried about you. you were up there for over two days. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: what do you think about these heroes, they're from iceland, men and women who rescued? >> i'm grateful. thank you. i don't know. i was still alive, but -- when they came, i really have faith that i would be rescued. >> reporter: we're so happy you're well. >> all i can say is thank you very much. >> reporter: thank you. >> reporter: and i was very hot. >> reporter: did you know what happened? >> well, i presumed that it was an earthquake, but i would not be 100% sure, because it happened so fast. my god, this is something i heard of -- i never thought how fast. >> reporter: were you
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
's not just child's talk. that's for real. the united states of america to borrow a phrase from will rogers, the economics of america is in a deep hole. and will rogers says, what do you do when you find yourself in a deep hole? you stop digging. well, it's not so easy to stop digging. but essentially we have to find ways, this task force, over the next year, bipartisan, consensual, working together, we have to find a way to present to the congress and the president and the american people a budget. multiyear, many years, it will encompass many years. and it will provide to us a way out of this enormous, unsustainable debt. now, i want to start with one of the graphs we have up here. and if i were somebody who could tie a graph into a proposal, i'd make this graph part of our everyday life. i don't know if i'd put it on our forehead and get somebody to screw it up there or what. let me step up here and show you this one. it says debt held by the public. and the word public is not just individuals. it's countries, it's institutions that have bought debt from the united states for all united
pronounce his last name. in germany, is "kussler." in the united states it is "kessler." it is generally "kessler." in europe it is "kussler." >> how many years have you spent with him in your life? >> we are talking 20 years. >> teaching where? >> i was teaching at cornell until 1994 and then i moved to columbia to teach nonfiction writing and translation which is my other hat that i wear. >> so, you are meeting with him. >> back in 1972, i founded a magazine called "index on censorship." it was about censorship in the arts and censorship of political books as well. i edited this for eight years until 1980 when i resigned to write my first biography which was of another man. i was a dinner at david's one evening and he invited arthur koestler to meet me and talk about passing this information on to people who knew that were writing in soviet occupied eastern europe and hungary. >> you said that he spent time in 14 different countries. >> is it 14? i had forgotten the number. >> give us a broad view of where it was. >> he grew up in hungary. his family was thrown out in 1919. they had re
for the night states -- the united states need to direct -- differentiate among different countries in the hemisphere. we have different priorities now. we are slow in washington on the hill and in the white house to come to that understanding. host: what is the political landscape in latin america? how has the landscape changed politically down there? guest: there is a much more diverse ideological group of countries such as venezuela and ecuador and bolivia which are not very friendly to the united states or to the market economy. on the other hand, we have a prpragmatic president likelula in central america. we have the problem of cuba and we have a terrible problem with haiti. host: on the issue of haiti, there is an article about a question of commitment and can the united states lead a long effort to rebuild haiti. what will the u.s. effort their say about our overall commitment to latin america in general? guest: the united states is best served by multilateral action. for example, the united nations peacekeeping force in haiti has been let for a number of years successfully
of receiving an address from the president of the united states. on thursday and friday, the house is not in session to give time for the republican issues conference to occur in baltimore,ed maryland. we will consider several bills under suspension. complete list will be announced by close of business tomorrow. in addition, madam speaker, we will consider h.r. 3726, the castle knife nugent establishment act of 2009 and h.r. 4474 the idaho will deerness protection act introduced by mr. minnick and mr. simpson. and i yield back. >> i thank the gentleman. madam speaker, i ask the gentleman if he could comment on some of the press reports that we have seen this morning about the speaker's statement that this house and you will not be bringing to this house the senate health care bill for consideration. and i yield. >> well, i didn't see the speaker's statements, so i can't comment specifically on it, but i can say this to the gentleman but as the gentleman knows, there are significant critical differences between the house and senate bills and we have been working on trying to bridge
, salute them at cnn.com/robin. >>> haitian immigrants are allowed in the united states to get medicare. ordinarily there's a lot of paperwork and delay involved. some of that is set aside after the earthquake in haiti t. rule change is temporary to make sure there's medical care for orphans in the pipeline to be adopted. >>> an iowa couple trying to adopt two haitian orphans saw one alive on tv. they spent the last two years going through the adoption red tape. >> beautiful. praise god. praise god. >> now, the couple just learned they can get one child this week. they are applying for a humanitarian visa to bring the second child here. >>> a grot broken through a strip club. a goat. >> myself on the surveillance tapes, i wouldn't have believed it, either. >> the goat spent 30 minutes staring at one thing inside the strip club. that story is new for you this hour. >> you dirty goat, you. >>> more money has been raised for the victims of haiti's earthquake than in the wake of hurricane katrina. jennifer westhoven is here now. i think a lot of it has to do with the ease of the texting giv
-- on, you are immediately check the database. is he in the united states? if he has a visa, you cancel it. if he wants to come here, that act drives the system to perhaps respond. but right now i don't think the system works. >> thank you. i'm afraid we're out of time. i'd like to thank the panel and thank the audience for coming. let me ask one more time, take a look at our web site www.mepc.org. take a look at our journal and other programs we offer. thank you for coming. [applause] [inaudible conversations] : >> senators john mccain and joe lieberman say that american drone strike just over the border in pakistan are critical in defeating terrorists in the region. this coming from "the associated press." senator lieberman saying the strikes tonight in a saving. senator mccain say they have not al qaeda and other islamic extremist organizations off-balance. he said the u.s. is working with afghanistan and pakistan to reduce civilian suffering. we will have more about u.s. policy in afghanistan, and the challenges the obama administration faces this afternoon. we will hear from richar
of more attacks on the united states and praises suspected terrorist u man farouk abdulmutallab, calling him, quote, a hero fighter. the white house says it cannot confirm as of yet the awe thoantivity of this tape we will be live at the white house with the latest. good morning, molly. >> reporter: the tape is not authenticated but officials tell us there's never been a fake tape from the terrorist leader, a u.s. official tells us that osama bin laden appears to be trying to attach himself to the underwear bombing operation, calling suspect u man farouk abdulmutallab a hero. al-qaeda in the arabian peninsula took responsibility for that bombing on christmas day, but the intelligence community doesn't think that the central al-qaeda group necessarily gives orders to al-qaeda in the arabian peninsula, that they may have shared ideology but they don't necessarily cooperate tactically. now, in the tape, bin laden also says that america can never dream of living in peace unless there is peace in palestine. >> it is unfair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffer greatly.
the world, in britain and the united states as well. jon. jon: these reports of prisoners getting out of gitmo and going back to yemen to fight, what can you tell us about that? >> well, on very many levels, it's concerning. it's concerning, as i said, for nearby saudi arabia, because some of the gitmo detainees have been released , have gotten into yemen, and then they may be released to saudi arabia, gone into yemen and gone back to saudi, one tried to detonate an explosive device right next to one of the saudi princes recently, but we are hearing about a dozen of the former guantanamo detainees are actively involved now, at a rather high level, in this al-qaeda -- in al-qaeda in the arabian peninsula, the affiliate the based in yemen. we also are hearing reports of a high recidivism rate, 14 percent from those released from guantanamo get back into terrorism in some way and the biggest concern is what's due for the 91 yemenis released from guantanamo bay, what will become of them, what should become of them, so it's a pretty massive concern and neighboring somalia, the group al-sha
they will bring them. the shortages are in just about everything. today, planes from the united states, china, france, and spain were among those landing at the airport. the military making it possible for supplies to fly in around the clock. all the more critical because of heavy damage to the port. president obama warned it may take hours or days for all american resources to get on the ground. >> none of this will seem quick enough if you have a loved one he was trapped, if you're sleeping on the streets, if you cannot feed your children. but it is important that everyone in haiti understand at this moment one of the largest relief efforts in our recent history is moving towards haiti. >> but mobilizing the ever- expanding international relief effort is only the first step. the logistical challenge of turning that into search and rescue operations for all the collapsed buildings, into medical help needed for the injured, and food and walter and shelter -- food and water and shelter for all those without homes is a nightmare. they are battling to cope. >> there are many people who survived,
dispute this and warn of tooth decay, constipation and worse. the united states ambassador to haiti has taken a personal interest in lessening dependence on the cookies. >> i've actually taken members of congress down to cite soleil and they've seen it, too. >> what do they say when they see people eating rt? >> well, it's worrisome. it's very worrisome and we don't like to see it. >> since the u.n. arrived in haiti in 2006 as peacekeepers, nutrition has improved in pockets, but the dirt cookies are still being eaten. the widespread hunger means hundreds of kids starting another school day in cite soleil as the haitian flag is raised, will be reduced to eating dirt. this, despite international efforts. >> there is hope, by the way. there is hope. because despite the bleak picture, it is doable to lift haiti out of poverty. >> but even the most optimistic observers agree the future is bleak for ese kids without two elements long missing in haiti -- money and a stable government. reporting in cite soleil, haiti, this has been art schmidt for "worldfocus." >>> officials in yemen said today
plotting to us weans ofass destruction against th united states. we will talk to the former senior cia officia who wrote it. >>> muslim students in lobbed co under increed scrutiny after the temptedombing of a u.s. ssenger plane on christmas day. >> and what is this? it's stand-up comedy in pakistan. >>> from theifferent perspeives of reporters and analysts from around thelobe, this is "wldfocus." major support has be provided by rosalind p. walter and th peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoti fiscal responsibity and addressing keeconomic challenges facing amera's future. and adtional funding is providedy the following supporters -- >>> gd evening. hk to"worldfocus." i'm daljithaliwal in w york. we start tonigh with what remains a key global suet the beginni of the 20. the economy. and in ma countries, a strule to emerge from th crippling ression. today the internation monety fund provided a worldwide snap shot of where tngs stand and where they are headed saying that the recovery is off to stronger sta than ticipated. it raised its growth forecast this year to 4% from just
into the united states face much tougher security measures. all travelers from 14 countries deemed a security risk can expect full body searches. this is one week after a failed attempt to blow up an american airliner. >> the extra security measures are targeted and highly visible. all passengers that fly from countries considered to pose a threat to the u.s. will be given full body pat downs, and ham luggage will be searched. four of those countries are on the list of sponsors of terrorism. three others are deemed to be of interest. they include cuba, nigeria, sudan, yemen, iran, syria, and pakistan. the white house has come under intense pressure to improve airport security in the wake of the failed bomb plot on christmas day. >> it is not that the system is broken, but there are ways to improve the system to make sure we can put together the various pieces of information in a way that allows us to stop every terrorist. >> the nigerian national boarded a plane bound for detroit. the explosives were allegedly sown into his underwear. they went undetected. there's no guarantee the new measures wou
the full support of the united states and the urgent effort to help those trapped beneath the rubble and to help with the humanitarian relief. in that effort, our government is specially usaid and the departments of state and offense are working closely together and with our partners are haiti, the region, and around the world. >> this is the worst earthquake to hit haiti in 200 years. joining me now from the state department is spokesman p.j. crowley. i'm sure americans are wondering if there's going to be international help here. what kind of communication has taken place between the state department and other countries in this massive relief effort? >> well, support for haiti is already an international effort with the united nations and assets from a number of countries. the united states and others will continue to flow systems to haiti. as rapidly as we can get it there for the united states we have put on the ground an assessment team, what are the priorities as we move through the next couple of days. as the president has said, our usaid administrator said, our focus is savin
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